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Why Sales Promises Must Be Different for Tech Vendors

Why Sales Promises Must Be Different for Tech Vendors

Sales people come in all stripes, regardless of the industry where they’re working. Most sales staff truly want to tell the truth about their products and what the client can expect when they’re making a pitch, but in some cases those truths can get colored to preserve the sale, or may even be just completely misrepresented.

In IT perhaps more than any other industry, it’s extremely important that the sales staff set the client expectations at a reasonable level, not just for the sake of the technician, but also for the salesperson’s own reputation.

Disconnected Delivery

One of the main reasons an employee selling technology must be self-critical of the promises they’re making during the pitch is that they themselves will not in any way be involved with the delivery and deployment of that technology. To promise a timeline or budget, therefore, may not be completely within their authority or understanding. Making that promise anyway simply to close a deal makes the sales person look extremely dishonest in the long run, and also puts their technician colleague in an uncomfortable position when they’re deploying the tech solution.

Rapid Industry Evolution

Another area where sales people must manage their promise-making is in the guarantee that a solution will serve a client for the next two years, ten years, or for their lifetime. Even with warranty and continual high-skilled maintenance, the best tech solution today will more than likely be out of date in a few years. It’s simply the way the industry has become. Instead of making blanket promises they can in no way keep, a sales person should be transparent with their prospect about this eventuality and discuss ways their company will be able to help the client keep up with technology. After all, everyone knows this about technology these days, so to do otherwise may lose you the sale, not close it.

Warranty and Service Provision

It’s also important that the sales person not lead the client or end user to expect that the technology will always work perfectly. Even telling them something as benign as “these things have a great track record” may lead them to believe they’ve been shortchanged if their own tech solution needs maintenance early on. Instead, they should allow that everything needs service and upkeep from time to time, and clearly outline for their prospect the channels by which they go about getting the support they are guaranteed to eventually need.

While sales staff in the IT sector need to carefully manage the expectations of those they sell to, the one thing they should always be able to promise without fear is that the technicians supporting the end user will be knowledgeable, professional, efficient, timely, and thorough. If that’s become a challenge for your team, consider partnering with an ally like DiverseNet who can vet technicians for you and ensure they have any proprietary training necessary to deploy your product offerings with skill and precision. 

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